Sneakin!

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Stealth

While travelling at a slow pace, the characters can move stealthily. As long as they’re not in the open, they can try to surprise or sneak by other creatures they encounter. A Slow Pace is considered to be 20’ per round, 2 miles an hour, or roughly 18 miles per day.

Make a Dexterity (Stealth) check when you want to conceal yourself from your enemies, slink past the guards, slip away without being noticed, or sneak up on someone without being seen or heard.

Hiding

When you try to hide, make a Dexterity (Stealth) check. Until you are discovered or you stop hiding, that check’s total is contested by the Wisdom (Perception) check of any creature that actively searches for signs of your presence.

You can’t hide from a creature that can see you, and if you make noise (such as shouting a warning or knocking over a vase), you give away your position. An invisible creature can’t be seen, so it can always try to hide. Signs of its passage might still be noticed, however, and it still has to stay quiet.

In combat, most creatures stay alert for signs of danger all around, so if you come out of hiding and approach a creature, it usually sees you. However, under certain circumstances, the DM might let you to stay hidden as you approach a creature that is distracted, allowing you to gain advantage on an attack before you are seen.

Passive Perception : When you hide, there’s a chance someone will notice you even if they aren’t searching. To determine whether such a creature notices you, the DM compares your Dexterity (Stealth) check with that creature’s passive Wisdom (Perception) score, which equals 10+ the creature’s Wisdom modifier, as well as any other bonuses or penalties. If the creature has advantage, add 5. For disadvantage, subtract 5.

For example, if a 1st-level character (with a proficiency bonus of +2) has a Wisdom of 15 (a +2 modifier) and proficiency in Perception, he or she has a passive Wisdom (Perception) of 14.

What Can You See? : The most fundamental task of adventuring – noticing danger, finding hidden objects, hitting an enemy in combat, and targeting a spell, just to name a few – rely heavily on a character’s ability to see. Darkness and other effects that obscure vision can prove a significant hindrance. One of the main factors in determining whether you can find a hidden creature or object is how well you can see in an area, which might be lightly or heavily obscured.

A given area that is considered Lightly Obscured, is under a dim light, patchy fog, or moderate foliage, granting creatures disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight.

A Heavily Obscured area – such as darkness, opaque fog, or dense foliage – blocks vision entirely. A creature in a heavily obscured area effectively suffers from the blinded condition.

The presence or absence of light in an environment creates three categories of illumination; bright light, dim light, and darkness.

Bright Light lets most creatures see normally. Even gloomy days provide bright light, as do torches, lanterns, fires, and other sources of illumination within a specific radius.

Dim Light, also called shadows, creates a lightly obscured area. An area of dim light is usually a boundary between a source of bright light, such as a torch, and the surrounding darkness. The soft light of twilight and dawn also counts as dim light. A particularly brilliant full moon might bathe the land in dim light.

Darkness creates a heavily obscured area. Characters face darkness outdoors at night (even most moonlit nights), within the confines of an unlit magical darkness.

Blindsight

A creature with blindsight can perceive its surroundings without relying on sight, within a specific radius. Creatures without eyes, such as oozes, and creatures with echolocation or heightened senses, such as bats and true dragons, have this sense.

Darkvision

Many creatures in the worlds of the Dominions, especially those that dwell underground, have darkvision. Within a specified range, a creature with darkvision can see in darkness as if it were dim light, so areas of darkness are only lightly obscured as far as that creature is concerned. However, the creature can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Truesight

A creature with truesight can, out to a specific range, see in normal and magical darkness, see invisible creatures and objects, automatically detect visual illusions and succeed on saving throws against them, and perceives the original form of a shapechanger or a creature that is transformed or poly-morphed by magic. Furthermore, the creature can see into the Ethereal Plane.

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Invisibility

An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. For the purpose of hiding, the creature is considered heavily obscured. The creature’s location can be detected by any noise it makes or any tracks it leaves.

Attack rolls against the creature have disadvantage, and the creature’s attack rolls have advantage.

Sneakin!

Thieves & Kings Robling